Frances Bean Cobain Does Not Hate Nirvana – Way to go TMZ

NirvanaIn a recent interview in Rolling Stone. the daughter of deceased Nirvana frontman, Kurt Cobain opens up about her larger than life dad. TMZ published their own version of the Rolling Stone piece putting words in the Cobain’s mouth. She clearly never uses the words “I Hate Nirvana” or anything close to that. Read the transcript below and check out the full interview HERE

RS: Do you remember the first time you heard a Nirvana record – and knowing that was your father? I’ve talked to Sean Lennon about this. He had a few more years with his dad that you did. But for him, the records were a road into understanding his father after he was gone.

Cobain: I don’t really like Nirvana that much [grins]. Sorry, promotional people, Universal. I’m more into Mercury Rev, Oasis, Brian Jonestown Massacre [laughs]. The grunge scene is not what I’m interested in. But “Territorial Pissings” [on Nevermind] is a fucking great song. And “Dumb” [on In Utero] – I cry every time I hear that song. It’s a stripped-down version of Kurt’s perception of himself – of himself on drugs, off drugs, feeling inadequate to be titled the voice of a generation.

What the hell is wrong with people? Why is there this insistence that Nirvana be her favorite band. She was in a diaper when they were making music. Is she not allowed to have her own tastes and likes?  If you have been a reader of us for a while you know that we are Nirvana fans but we don’t insist that she has to be one, nor do we insist anyone else is. Plus she does say she likes some of their music.

She goes on to talk about the new film Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck:

RS: How would you describe Montage of Heck?

Cobain: It’s emotional journalism. It’s the closest thing to having Kurt tell his own story in his own words – by his own aesthetic, his own perception of the world. It paints a portrait of a man attempting to cope with being a human. When Brett and I first met, I was very specific about what I wanted to see, how I wanted Kurt to be represented. I told him, “I don’t want the mythology of Kurt or the romanticism.” Even though Kurt died in the most horrific way possible, there is this mythology and romanticism that surrounds him, because he’s 27 forever. The shelf life of an artist or musician isn’t particularly long. Kurt has gotten to icon status because he will never age. He will always be that relevant in that time and always be beautiful.

There is, with any great artist, a little manic-ness and insanity. Tropic of Cancer is one of my favorite books. And [author] Henry Miller had this work ethic, where he would get out of bed every day and force himself to write five pages. It taught me that if you do the work, you progress. So many people are content to settle. My dad was exceptionally ambitious. But he had a lot thrown on him, exceeding his ambition. He wanted his band to be successful. But he didn’t want to be the fucking voice of a generation.